THE AbCF DIRECTORS

BARRY HUNTER - CHAIR

BARRY HUNTER - CHAIR

Barry J Hunter is a descendant from the Djabugay speaking people of Cairns hinterland. He grew up besides the Barron River in the rainforest near Kuranda. Barry’s experience includes employment in Government conservation agencies, mining and exploration industry, community and not-for-profit NGO’s, and recently as a consultant working around Aboriginal Land Management, Carbon Industry and community economic development. With over 30 years experience in Aboriginal affairs particular in areas of land, natural and cultural resource management.

Barry has a Bachelor of Applied Science from Charles Sturt University and has a keen interest in the work community rangers do in looking after land, fire management and cultural heritage. Also having a real passion building community capacity and planning that deliver sustainable social, cultural and economic outcomes within our communities.

MARCIA LANGTON, B.A. (Hons, 1st Class) ANU, PhD Macq. U., A.M., F.A.S.S.A.

MARCIA LANGTON, B.A. (Hons, 1st Class) ANU, PhD Macq. U., A.M., F.A.S.S.A.

Professor Marcia Langton holds the Chair of Australian Indigenous Studies at the University of Melbourne, and was appointed Distinguished Redmond Barry Chair. She is an anthropologist and geographer and is widely-published on topics in Australian Indigenous Studies, including Aboriginal land tenure, Aboriginal art and Indigenous agreement-making. Professor Langton was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 1993 for services to anthropology and advocacy of Aboriginal rights. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. In 2017, Professor Langton was appointed as the first Associate Provost at the University of Melbourne. Her research interests lie in the areas of political and legal anthropology, Indigenous agreements and engagement with the minerals industry, and Indigenous culture and art. She established and managed several collaborative research projects (funded by the ARC and Industry partners in a sequence of ARC Linkage grants) in the fields of Indigenous agreement making and implementation, overcoming poverty and marginalisation by establishing good practice in governance and distribution of mining benefits, and traditional resource rights.

Professor Langton has a track record in traditional Indigenous knowledge systems, digital technologies, and developed critical methodologies for researchers, including scientists, social scientists and historians, in the challenges of sustaining cultural knowledge and biological diversity in Aboriginal societies.

JOHN CLARK

JOHN CLARK

John Clark is from Kowanyama. Through his father’s side, he is a Kokoberra person. Through his mother’s side, he is an Ewamain person. He has been the manager for the Kowanyama Aboriginal Land and Natural Resource Management Office for three years. He is a Board member for the Aboriginal Carbon Foundation.

BRAD FOSTER

BRAD FOSTER

LEANN WILSON

LEANN WILSON

Leann is a Bidjara and Kara-Kara First Nation and South Sea Islander descendent. Leann possesses high level analytical and conceptual skills, with experience and expertise in developing and implementing place-based strategies and initiatives. With excellent mediation and negotiations skills, particularly in regard to Native Title and Cultural Heritage, Leann has the ability to facilitate effective connections and productive working relationships with diverse stakeholder groups. Leann’s business and management skills include gender focussed leadership, mentoring, participative work practices, OH&S and professional development. Leann also has the ability to rapidly understand and critique strategic and policy directions.

She also brings an articulate knowledge, understanding and life experiences of First Nations culture and protocols. In recognition of Leann’s influence, she has recently received the Queensland Premier’s Reconciliation Award for 2016 and supported the Australian Government at the Commission on the Status of Women 61st session (CSW61) in New York 2017. In 2019 was named in the Australian Financial Review’s 100 women of influence.

BRIAN STACEY

BRIAN STACEY

Brian has over 30 years’ experience working for the Australian Government in Indigenous Affairs. This included working with remote communities in the Northern Territory, in the Department of Aboriginal Affairs, and heading up ATSIC’s Native Title and Land Rights Branch for five years. He was the Manager of Indigenous Affairs in the Northern Territory from 2004 to 2009. Brian has also had considerable policy experience and led the development of the Stronger Futures in the NT Package. After leaving the public service in 2014, Brian decided to work for Aboriginal organisations. His current commitments include a Board director for the Centre for Appropriate Technology and the Aboriginal Carbon Foundation.

LYNDSAY URQUHART

LYNDSAY URQUHART

Lyndsay is a Yuin woman, and a local in the Dharawal community of Western Sydney. Lyndsay is the Curator of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art at First Hand Solutions Aboriginal Corporation, and an artist education guide at the Art Gallery of NSW. Lyndsay is on the Board of Directors of the Aboriginal Carbon Fund, and works as a freelance documentary filmmaker, and as a remedial massage therapist. Lyndsay is also enrolled in a Master of Philosophy at the University of New England, exploring the opportunities within art and cultural tourism as a means of preserving culture, and histories.

Passionate about art and culture, Lyndsay has worked as a discovery ranger with National Parks and Wildlife, NSW where she was mentored by a Yuin Elder on culture, bush foods and medicines, and how to appropriately teach culture to the public. Lyndsay has worked with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists for more than 12 years, and as an artist for 5 years. With a diverse set of experience, her career has enabled her to work with artists and Indigenous cultural leaders locally, nationally and internationally, across a diversity of genres including music, film, dance, theatre, sculpture, advertising, craft and visual arts. Lyndsay has experience working in local, state and federal government organisations, charities, sporting organisations, and in the corporate environment. Lyndsay first launched her career into the arts in 2006 as the publicist for the Yabun Festival, whilst studying a Bachelor of arts in public communications at the University of Technology, Sydney. In her final year of study, Lyndsay was involved in the setting up of the Natural Resources Stewardship Circle, in France, which involved Nyoongar artist and leader Dr Richard Walley as one of the founding members of the Circle.

© ABORIGINAL CARBON FOUNDATION 2020

Website created by RJ New Designs